Tuesday, September 29, 2020

"Arlo the lion who couldn't sleep" - a bookwrap

 




Unwrapping 








Arlo the lion who couldn't sleep

Authored/ Illustrated by Catherine Rayner



* Ages:  3-7

* Grade Level:  PS-2

* Hardcover:  32 pages

* Publisher:  Macmillan Children Books

* Pub. Date:  Oct. 6, 2020

* Language:  English



Unwrapping Some Illustrations for You

















The Book



Arlo the lion is fatigued!  He has tried everything to get to sleep but...   


“The grass was too prickly, and the earth was too hard.…The sun was too hot, but the night was too cold.”  


What is an exhausted lion to do to be able to curl up and drift off to sleep?  He is frustrated, very, very weary and all alone on this dark and never-ending night.  



He has an encounter with a nocturnal owl that helps him with his insomnia problem.  She quietly sings a calming song to him that will grant him a deep and restful slumber. 


“Think about the places where you’d like to be, / the things that you’d do there and what you might see. / Relax your whole body, slow your breathing right down, / imagine you’re sinking into the soft ground.” 

 

Will Arlo take her wise advice and finally get the peaceful shut-eye that he is longing for?


The illustrations are gorgeous.  They are vibrant, colourful and mesmerizing.  This a perfect bedtime story to be shared just before turning off the light.  I highly recommend this book!  It's a winner.  



 

Storywraps Rating 





Meet the Author







Catherine Rayner studied illustration at Edinburgh College of Art. She is the creator of numerous picture books including: Abigail, Solomon Crocodile, Solomon and Mortimer, Smelly Louie, and Augustus and His Smile, for which she was awarded the prestigious CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal. She is also the illustrator of The Go-Away Bird, written by bestselling children's author Julia Donaldson. Catherine still lives in Edinburgh with her young family and a small menagerie of creatures - Shannon the horse, Ena the cat, and a goldfish named Richard - all of whom inspire her work.



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I put hours of work finding the best kid's books to review for you each day.  If you enjoy visiting Storywraps and would like to donate something for my time and effort I would greatly appreciate it.

Go to the top of my blog at the right hand corner (below my photo) and please donate what you feel lead to give.  The amount you donate and the frequency you donate is totally up to you.  


I also have added a new button... ko-fi.com/storywraps  Simply buy me a cup of coffee if you would rather.  That would be fun.  Coffee and blogging go together like two peas in a pod as I'm always brewing up something here on Storywraps. 

 I thank you in advance for your support.  I adore what I do and would appreciate any amount that you may give so that I can make our Storywraps' community more thriving and exciting.  Thanks a million!  Books bind us together.   



Read on.....Read always!

It's a wrap! 



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Monday, September 28, 2020

Twinkle, Twinkle, Diaper You! - a bookwrap

 






Unwrapping 





Twinkle, Twinkle, Diaper You! 


Authored by Ellen Mayer

Illustrated by Ying-Hwa


* Ages:  0-2

* Board book:  18 pages

* Publisher:  Star Bright Books

* Pub. Date:  June 30, 2020

* Language:  English

* Reading Level:  Baby - 3 years



Unwrapping Some Illustrations for You














The Book



 Twinkle, Twinkle, Diaper You! is the newest book in the Small Talk Books series.  This sweet book showcases a baby that needs a diaper change.  His loving mother gently picks him up and lays him on the change table all the while talking, cooing and singing her rendition of "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star" making the event a happy and fun one for both mother and child.  


The book encourages parents to interact with their babies, face to face giving them hugs, kisses and using lots of verbal language as they go about their day.  It focuses on the first stage of language development and the talented illustrator has featured sparkling stars throughout that  mesmerize little babies.  


The author has included a note for parents, caregivers, and families by renowned early literacy education expert, Betty Bardige, Ed.D.  Love, adoration and happiness flow through this short board book and I highly recommend it. 



Storywraps Rating - 5 Hugs! 







Meet the Author






Ellen Mayer is a children’s book author and early literacy educator who works with diverse families and young children. For many years she was a researcher at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education. She is also a brand-new grandma!


Ellen creates picture books for young children - and the grown-ups who read to them. Her Small Talk Books® picture book collection, published by Star Bright Books, is fun for little ones and also helps adults learn ways to build the language of babies and young children through conversation during everyday small moments together. The most recent books, created with the Storytelling Math project at the nonprofit STEM education organization TERC, also help adults enrich young children’s understanding of how math is part of daily life. BANANA FOR TWO is full of playful conversation about amounts of one and two; CLEAN UP, UP, UP! focuses on spatial relations.


Ellen has also collaborated with the award-winning South African author Sindiwe Magona, to write a book for middle grade readers, BOOKS AND BRICKS: How a School Rebuilt the Community.


Visit Ellen at www.ellenmayerbooks.com 

or @ellenmayerbooks on twitter.



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I put hours of work finding the best kid's books to review for you each day.  If you enjoy visiting Storywraps and would like to donate something for my time and effort I would greatly appreciate it.

Go to the top of my blog at the right hand corner (below my photo) and please donate what you feel lead to give.  The amount you donate and the frequency you donate is totally up to you.  


I also have added a new button... ko-fi.com/storywraps  Simply buy me a cup of coffee if you would rather.  That would be fun.  Coffee and blogging go together like two peas in a pod as I'm always brewing up something here on Storywraps. 

 I thank you in advance for your support.  I adore what I do and would appreciate any amount that you may give so that I can make our Storywraps' community more thriving and exciting.  Thanks a million!  Books bind us together.   



Read on.....Read always!

It's a wrap! 



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Saturday, September 26, 2020

The Importance of Kids Reading Non-Fiction - various bookwraps

 

Guest Post:  www. home.oxfordowl.co.uk


A case for non-fiction:

five reasons to read non-fiction with your child


By James Clements, posted on 30th April 2019






James Clements was a primary teacher for many years, including seven years teaching in Year 6. He now works as a writer and education researcher. He is also the parent of two quite loud primary-aged children. James is a member of the Advisory Board for Oxford Owl. Twitter: @MrJClements






I always feel a bit sorry for non-fiction.

It must be hard to be defined by what you aren’t, rather than having a proper name of your own. It’s a bit like calling dogs ‘non-cats’ or having two children and calling them Sam and Not-Sam.

Despite the name we’ve chosen to give it, non-fiction is far more than simply an absence of fiction. Non-fiction is a vital part of children’s reading experience. Reading non-fiction allows children to follow their interests and immerse themselves in the subjects they are interested in. It opens up new worlds for children, introducing them to ideas that will broaden their horizons and help them to make sense of the world.

And we live in a golden age of non-fiction at the moment. The modern web-connected world, where any conceivable fact is just an online search away, might have spelled the death of non-fiction. Instead, non-fiction has flourished. A quick browse in any bookshop or library will reveal shelves of beautiful non-fiction texts, as attractive as they are fascinating.

At school and at home, non-fiction should be a key part of every child’s reading diet. Here are five reasons why:



1. Non-fiction can help your child find their identity as a reader

For some of us, losing ourselves in a great novel is one of life’s greatest pleasures. But that isn’t for everyone. The reading of many adults consists principally of non-fiction texts: biographies, history books, the newspaper or websites that reflect their interests.Reading non-fiction helps children to form their own tastes and opinions. You don’t know what you like until you’ve tried it.



2. Non-fiction is great for children’s vocabulary

Reading non-fiction will introduce children to lots of new words. Some of this will be technical language linked to the subject they’re reading about – pirouette or soubresaut in a book about ballet, for example.

But even more useful are words that are less common in speech and fiction, but are useful for education – words like consistentdefinitionindicate. Words like these are so useful for understanding the texts used at school, and non-fiction is often full of them.



3. Non-fiction helps children learn new language patterns

It’s not just new words that children can learn from non-fiction – the patterns of language themselves are often very different. For example, non-fiction tends to make greater use of the passive voice (it is thought that…, rather than I think that…). Reading these patterns of language can help children to absorb them and use them in their own writing, particularly in the more formal types of writing that are useful for school and beyond.



4. Non-fiction uses different skills to fiction reading

While we might pick up a non-fiction text and read it from cover to cover like a work of fiction, the chances are we’ll read it very differently. We might skim through, looking for something that catches our eye, or we might scan a page about a topic we know a lot about already, before slowing down to read about something new more carefully. We might use the glossary to look up the meaning of a new word or use the index to find a topic quickly.

These reading skills are taught and practised in classrooms all over the country, but reading non-fiction gives children a chance to practise them at home with books they enjoy. And, of course, these reading skills are useful at secondary school when researching for homework or finding information for an essay.



5. Non-fiction isn’t always about the reading

The benefits that children get from reading are well known. Academic research has suggested a link between reading in childhood and stronger reading skills, better school results in general, increased empathy for others, a larger vocabulary, increased happiness as a teenager… Being a reader is one of the most important things we can do for future success and happiness.

But while we’d love every child to be an avid reader, some children prefer to spend their time doing other things – drawing, sports, music, using screens or just playing with their toys. No matter how good our intentions, forcing children to read because it’s good for them could well backfire and make them even less keen to read. Non-fiction (both books and on screen) can be a secret weapon in the battle for reading: unlike a story book, children don’t always see non-fiction as proper reading.

When we’re finding out about something we’re interested in, the activity becomes about the topic we’re interested in, rather than reading itself. And time spent enjoying a fascinating non-fiction text might just be enough to kick-start the reading habit.



Non-fiction top picks



If you’re looking for some engaging non-fiction books, here are some suggestions to get you started:



Ages 5–7






The Variety of Life

Nicola Davies and Lorna Scobie


A fascinating, exquisitely illustrated (and pleasingly huge) book celebrating the richness of life on Earth. Each page is covered in wonderful creatures with facts about them. While children might need some help reading all of the text (especially the Latin names), this is a great book to share and enjoy together.







The Brilliant Deep

Kate Messner and Matthew Forsythe


A glorious picture book that tells the story of Ken Nedimyer and his quest to save and rebuild the world’s coral reefs. Perfect for any age, but great for younger children because of the pictures and accessible text.




Ages 7–9




What’s the Difference?

Emma Strack and Guillaume Plantevin


Each page of this captivating book takes two seemingly similar things (Antarctica and the Arctic, noodles and pasta, a bus and a coach) and compares them, pointing out how they differ. The book is perfectly designed and covers a wide range of topics.






The Fantastically Great Women series

Kate Pankhurst


A brilliant series for children of all ages which introduces children to wonderful women who have achieved great things. Younger children will enjoy the pictures and be interested in the stories and achievements of the remarkable people the books describe. As they get older, children will be able to appreciate some of the barriers that stood in the way of their achievements.



Ages 9–11




The Professor Astro Cat series

Ben Newman and Dominic Walliman


In this series of five glorious titles, Professor Astro Cat explores everything from the human body to space. Packed full of facts and beautiful illustrations, these books manage to make very big topics accessible without ever dumbing down.





Football School

Alex Bellos, Ben Lyttleton and Spike Gerrell


The three (so far) Football School titles set out to explain the world through the medium of football, blending facts and stories, illustrations and lots of humour. A sure-fire hit in every KS2 classroom I know.




💜💜💜

Have a beautiful weekend everyone and thanks for visiting Storywraps.  This is a blog where everyone is welcome.  Please return and join me next week as I unwrap some more great kid's book for theirs ( and your )  reading pleasure.  



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I put hours of work finding the best kid's books to review for you each day.  If you enjoy visiting Storywraps and would like to donate something for my time and effort I would greatly appreciate it.

Go to the top of my blog at the right hand corner (below my photo) and please donate what you feel lead to give.  The amount you donate and the frequency you donate is totally up to you.  


I also have added a new button... ko-fi.com/storywraps  Simply buy me a cup of coffee if you would rather.  That would be fun.  Coffee and blogging go together like two peas in a pod as I'm always brewing up something here on Storywraps. 

 I thank you in advance for your support.  I adore what I do and would appreciate any amount that you may give so that I can make our Storywraps' community more thriving and exciting.  Thanks a million!  Books bind us together.   



Read on.....Read always!

It's a wrap! 


💜💜💜




Friday, September 25, 2020

Monty's Special Day - a bookwrap

 


Unwrapping 





Monty's Special Day


Authored by Ellen Delange

Illustrated by Malgorzata Zajac






* Ages:  3+

* Grade Level: PS-2

* Hardcover:  32 pages

* Publisher:  Clavis

* Pub. Date:  November 27, 2020

* Language:  English


International Publications will be available: 

Dutch ( 02/2020)

Arabic ( Jordan, 2020 )

Danish ( 2020 )

Slovenian ( 2020 ) 



Editorial Review



Monty is a blue, wide-eyed donkey who''s content with his life on the farm, among other loving animals. But someone left the gate open today, and Monty is tempted to wander. Curious by nature, he follows the examples set by a moose and some geese before realizing that he''s not at home among beavers and squirrels. Monty is more than happy when his adventures lead him home.The book''s active, bright illustrations celebrate both exploration and being happy where you are." - Foreword Reviews "



Unwrapping Some Illustrations for You














The Book


Monty is an adorable little donkey who is happy with his farm life and the variety of animals he is lucky enough to have as his friends.  One day he discovers that someone has left the gate wide open and his curiosity gets the best of him and out he goes on an adventure.  He encounters different creatures on his undertaking:  wild geese flying overhead, a moose eating some juicy berries, some rowdy squirrels gathering seeds and nuts, and some busy beavers cutting down trees with their sharp teeth. 


Monty is out of breath and exhausted now and lays down for a little rest.  The geese return and point him in the direction of home.  Thank goodness!  Monty realizes that although it's fun to escape from your every day surroundings and life it's even more fun to return to the comfort and safety of your own sweet home.  He learns that home is where his heart is.  


The illustrations enrich the message of the text and are colourful and detailed.  This is how the story of Monty's Special Day originated in the author's own words:  


"I often pass a farmhouse that’s located near a small river. In the meadow lives a friendly donkey. He always walks the same loop, but sometimes I see him standing still, looking up. Once, I wondered what he was looking at. Could it be the geese flying overhead?

I imagined that one day his curiosity would prompt him to follow the birds, to find out where they are going.

His typical donkey day then turns out to be a special day, and he can’t wait to share his adventure with his friends. 

That’s how the story of Monty’s Special Day came to be. "


I highly recommend this book. 



Storywraps Rating 





 

Meet the Author



Ellen DeLange has been fascinated by picture books ever since she was a child growing up in the Netherlands. In the attic of her home she assembled a small library and shared her collection with friends and family. As an adult she started traveling and expanded her library with picture books from all over the world. Ellen also enjoyed inventing her own stories and was encouraged by her daughter to write her first picture book, A Story with a Tale. Ellen has a doctorate in medical sciences, and currently lives in Canada where she loves to walk in the woods with her Jack Russell terriers, drink lots of tea after a busy day, and sail on the ocean to clear her mind. When I Look Up is her third book. 



About the Illustrator



Malgosia Zajac is a polish illustrator. She lives with her family in a very old polish city called Krakow.

This city is well known for it’s famous dragon (unfortunately not in good shape anymore) and for “Wawel” royal castle (still in very good shape). 

 

She strongly believes that imagination is the most important thing in her artistic live. Her head is always full of all kind of creatures, imaginary friends, magical worlds and incredible storys. She uses her skills and different techniques to create nonexistent worlds on paper in her illustrations.

 

The shelves in her workshop are full of beautiful books, illustrated by her favorite artists from all over the world. She admires them and still learns something new from them. Malgosia dreams that one day, her illustrated books will be on someones favorite shelve too. https://www.instagram.com/bigdotillustrations/



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*Blog Link:  www.babybookworms.blogspot.ca

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I put hours of work finding the best kid's books to review for you each day.  If you enjoy visiting Storywraps and would like to donate something for my time and effort I would greatly appreciate it.

Go to the top of my blog at the right hand corner (below my photo) and please donate what you feel lead to give.  The amount you donate and the frequency you donate is totally up to you.  


I also have added a new button... ko-fi.com/storywraps  Simply buy me a cup of coffee if you would rather.  That would be fun.  Coffee and blogging go together like two peas in a pod as I'm always brewing up something here on Storywraps. 

 I thank you in advance for your support.  I adore what I do and would appreciate any amount that you may give so that I can make our Storywraps' community more thriving and exciting.  Thanks a million!  Books bind us together.   



Read on.....Read always!

It's a wrap! 


💜💜💜