Friday, November 7, 2014

Gator, Gator, Second Grader - a book review


Joking around some this morning.....

Q: What do you call an alligator in a vest? A: An Investigator 

Q: What's the similarity between a Alligator and Windows? A: Neither of them has enough bytes! 


Q: How many arms has a alligator got? A: Depends how far he has got with eating his dinner! 


Q: What do you get if you cross a alligator with a flower? A: I don't know, but I'm not going to smell it! 


Q: Did you hear about the law firm with the most intimidating lawyers? A: It's filled with liti-gators. 


Q: What do you call a crocodile with GPS? A: A Navi-gator. Q: What do alligators call human children? A: Appetizers. 


Q: Who gives alligators presents on Christmas? A: Santa Jaws! 


Q: What's worse than one alligator coming to dinner? A: Two alligators coming to dinner 


Q: Why are alligators comedians so funny? A: Their wit is as razor sharp as their teeth! Q: Why won't alligators attack lawyers? A: Professional courtesy! 


Q: What do yuppie alligators like to drink A: Jaw-va 


Q: What was the nerd alligators favorite programming language A: Jaw-va 


Q: What do you call an alligator that makes others fight? A: An Instigator. 


Q: What is an alligators favorite smell? A: Human blood. 


Q: What do you call a man too big for an alligator to eat? A: a jawbreaker. 


Q: Did you hear about the crocodile who became a congressman? A: He was an expert dele-gator. 


Q: What do you call a reptile that works on a farm? A: An irrigator. 


An alligator can go through 3,000 teeth in a lifetime. Got infected from an alligator bite, now I have gatoraids. 


source: http://www.jokes4us.com/animaljokes/alligatorjokes.html


Featuring today's book:




Title:  Gator, Gator, Second Grader 
Classroom Pet or Not?
Author:  Conrad J. Storad
Illustrator:  Alex Lopez

Let's take a peek inside shall we?













About the book:

Having taught grade two (my most favourite grade to teach of all) and been an elementary school librarian I certainly would have had this book in my classroom and library.  The book teaches children how to respect nature through choosing pets that are suitable to live in a classroom environment.

The adorable gerbil narrator, Sue, nicknamed Snoozer because of her sleeping habits, is the perfect choice to invite, guide and teach your child all about the different animals that are featured candidates to reside in school.  

The cover illustration is picture perfect as it entices the curious child to discover what possibly is housed inside that mysterious box with holes poked all through it and who owns that one big eye staring out into the world beyond.  The illustrations are vibrant, expressive and marry with the text perfectly.  The cartoonish animals show their personality traits and lots of visual learning occurs through studying the pictures alone.  

Benny and Jacob, residents of grade two, bring a baby alligator to school in a cardboard box wondering if they can keep it amongst the multiple critters already living there.  Mrs. Nichols, their smart and creative teacher, has the perfect teaching moment handed right  to her.  "Many creatures make great classroom pets, but others just DO NOT!"  "A baby alligator is NOT a good classroom pet!"  She then takes her class on a compare and contrast animal adventure sorting out which pets are suitable and which are not.  The children, excited with the spontaneity of the moment, exuberantly join in as they put on their thinking caps to discern the answers their teacher is seeking.  

The children learn a valuable lesson in proper pet etiquette for a classroom and after meaningful discussion and enlightenment I am sure the baby gator was taken back to its natural habitat in the wild where it belonged.  The book has a comprehensive accompanying curriculum guide with language and pictures masterfully crafted for early elementary readers. Any caregiver, parent, teacher or librarian would be very proud to include this book in their collection.  Highly recommended.


About the Author:




A good nonfiction story should be more than just a bunch of facts. Author Conrad J. Storad says that nonfiction stories should be fun. That's exactly what he tries to do with each and every book that he writes for young readers. Storad is an award-winning author, editor, and science writer. He is the author of more than 50 science and nature books for children and young adults. His books have won many national awards.


About the illustrator:






Alex Lopez is a self-taught art it whose career initially developed in the video game industry, where he worked for Sega, 2K games and Konami.  He has also provided artistic production and management services for Disney interactive, Dynamite Comics and Stanford University.  Lopez is proficient with numerous print, digital and multimedia genres and currently serves as an art director, building and training artistic teams.  Residing in the Silicon Valley in California with his wife and identical triplet daughters, Lopez has a strong passion for enhancing his skills as an artist; yet his true joy comes from spending time with his wife and children.   

                      *****www.conceptartfactory.com*****



Book review rating:  9 (close to perfection!)

Read on and read always!
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